2019 - 2021 Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program (CAPPTP)

Rebecca Schwartz, PhD and Debbie Vuong, MFT, Co-Chairs

LATENCY AND ADOLESCENT - SECOND YEAR

Psychoanalytically oriented treatment of children and adolescents makes demands on the therapist that are different than treatment of adults. Older children are on the threshold of new experiences of their minds and bodies. How do we reach these inner worlds when they often can’t use words to tell us about their experience? The therapist has to bring together the child's behaviors, and their own countertransference reactions, to try to arrive at the underlying meanings of the child's world.

The Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program (CAPPTP) is a two-year training program consisting of seminars that address the relational, environmental, and intra-psychic processes for both parent and child, and offers in-depth examples of interventions. The training program uses class discussion, readings, case presentations by instructors and participants, and individual clinical supervision to enrich and enliven clinical work and theoretical understanding.

Students participate in at least 50-hours of weekly individual supervision in order to foster clinical growth and in-depth understanding to their work as well as provide a place for mentorship. Supervisors are chosen from SFCP faculty, occurs in the supervisors’ private offices, and can be provided at a reduced fee.

Year two of this two-year program addresses latency and adolescence, focusing on school-age children, adolescents, and the integration between child and adult work. Year one of this two-year program addresses infancy and early childhood. Both years will include a case conference seminar where students will have the opportunity to present and discuss a specific clinical case to the group. Attention will be paid to different theoretical orientations and to cultural and sexual diversity.

Benefits of enrollment include a subscription to PEP-Web, Community Membership at SFCP, admittance to Child Colloquia held at SFCP, and admittance to a free series of presentations provided by The Child Analytic Program of SFCP demonstrating the scope of child psychoanalysis today.

Please Note: This is a two-year commitment and students are required to complete 50 hours of supervision with a supervisor chosen from any Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy faculty. Applications will be accepted for the September 2021 program beginning in April 2020.

Dates: Wednesdays, September 9, 2020 to May 19, 2021
Time: 07:30pm - 09:00pm
Sessions: 33 sessions
Location: San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tuition Fee: TBA
Note: More information will be available shorlty.

Wednesday, September 6, 2020
Michael Donner, PhD; Rebecca Schwartz, PhD; and Debbie Vuong, MFT

Play provides a medium where a child's emotional realities can be understood and transformed. What are the different faces and levels of play with latency aged children? We will explore what we mean by latent and how this developmental stage impacts a child’s capacity to play. We will examine from various theoretical perspectives how the child therapist enters the play, listens with her whole being, and utilizes her countertransference and imagination to move around inside the play's metaphors.Play provides a medium where a child's emotional realities can be understood and transformed. What are the different faces and levels of play with latency aged children? We will explore what we mean by latent and how this developmental stage impacts a child’s capacity to play. We will examine from various theoretical perspectives how the child therapist enters the play, listens with her whole being, and utilizes her countertransference and imagination to move around inside the play's metaphors.

Wednesdays, September 16, 23, 30; October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020
Carolina Bacchi, PsyD; and Stephen Lugar, PsyD

The transition to adolescence is a dynamic and intense one. It is a time of gathering and transforming oneself while confronted by changes in one’s body and one’s thinking. At the same time, infantile issues always are present with more evolved processes and feel particularly ripe in this transitional process to adolescence. This course will present both theoretical and clinical ideas about pre-adolescence looking at relationships, complicated feelings, cultural pressures and family dynamics.

Wednesdays, November 4, 11, 18; December 2, 9, 2020
(no class on November 25)
Reyna Cowan, PsyD, LCSW

This conversation about adolescence will consider “what’s normal, what’s not.” Through didactic material and case discussion, we will consider such issues as gender identity, sex and sexual development within the context of the psychological and physiological stages of adolescence. From Middle School to High School, peer pressure, school and family provide a context for the development of the adult mind, distinct but engaged with the oedipal and preoedipal family. Sex, drugs, and social media all provide for the expression of the seething cauldron of this complex developmental period.

Wednesdays, December 16, 2020; January 6, 13, 20, 27; Februray 3, 17, 2021
(no classes on December 23, 30 and February 10)
Michael Donner, PhD

Wednesday, February 24, 2021
Michael Donner, PhD; Rebecca Schwartz, PhD; and Debbie Vuong, MFT

Participants will have the opportunity to present detailed process notes of sessions from their own active child and adolescent cases to their fellow classmates and to two experienced clinicians who will facilitate the discussions. Following each session closely, we will track the emotional tone of the patient-therapist interactions and the transference-countertransference. We will try to identify the child’s level of psychic functioning and his or her anxieties and defenses. We will discuss how to establish an appropriate frame and how to formulate interpretations or interventions that have the potential to facilitate the child’s psychic integration and growth. Working with the child’s, or adolescent’s parents to support the treatment will be considered as well.

Wednesdays, March 3, 10, 17, 24; April 4, 7, 14, 21, 2021
(no class on March 31)
Rebecca Schwart, PhD; and Debbie Vuong, MFT

In this class we will discuss a life cycle perspective of therapy, and explore how the transgenerational transmission of trauma works using clinical examples from both child and adult therapies.

If we are trained in understanding the life cycle, we can treat a person of any age. We show by playing and speaking with a child that we believe in putting the meaning being conveyed into words, one step removed from the experience of play. We can think about the play, which symbolizes what is felt and needs to be known for integrative purposes. When does the transition occur to a therapy with an adolescent or an adult who is sitting in the chair talking, using language symbolically, to describe an “as if” instead of acting out a reality? I would argue that all therapy is a kind of play therapy, in which we interact at the level of play, while starting to “think about” the play with the patient of any age. When we work with an adult we talk about their childhood in order to understand how they unconsciously hold past experiences. When we work with a child we talk to the parents in order to understand the transgenerational transmission of trauma. We help the parents speak about the “ghosts in the nursery”, the traumas of their past, that are unconsciously conveyed to their children via projection and unprocessed, split-off affect.

Wednesdays, April 28; May 5, 12, 19, 2021
Amy Tyson, MD